Janken: Rock, Paper or Scissors

Janken: Rock, Paper or Scissors

Janken: Rock, Paper or Scissors

Janken: Rock, Paper or Scissors

Janken: Rock, Paper or Scissors

Rock, paper or scissors is a children’s game also known as cachipún, jankenpon, dum-kin-voy, yan ken po, chis bun papas, hakembó, chin-chan-pu, or kokepon.
It is a sleight of hand in which there are three elements.

The stone that defeats the scissors by breaking it; the scissors that beat the paper by cutting it; and the paper that defeats the stone by enveloping it.

This represents a cycle, which gives the game its essence.
This game is widely used to decide who of two people will do something, as is sometimes done using a coin, or to settle an issue.

All the world

In Japan, Peru, Bolivia, Brazil (rock, paper and scissors) and in some cities of Colombia it is known as jan-ken-po, in Mexico it is popularly known as chin-chan-pu, chin-guas-pul or stone , paper or scissors, also in some parts of the country it is said when playing: «Boy Scout» (boy-es-caut).

The reason that the same nomenclature is used in South America as in Japan is that Peruvians and Brazilians descended from Japanese immigrants tend to play it as their parents taught it: they sing jan … ken … and throw their hand when they say Po! being deformed in Chile like ca-chi-pún.

In Argentina and Uruguay it is often called Stone, Paper or Scissors.
In Paraguay it is called Hakembó. In some cities of Colombia (such as Bogotá) it is probably due to the inclusion in certain Japanese children’s television programs, in which that word was not translated.

New way

In 2013, a new way of playing this typical children’s game was developed.
This consists of making a path of chairs that form a square, so one starts the game from the back line of the square and progresses as he wins games against his competitor, in case of a tie, both participants must return one space each .

Thus the player who first leaves the square of chairs will be the winner.